ANL 27.74 Increased By ▲ 0.24 (0.87%)
ASC 16.95 Decreased By ▼ -0.06 (-0.35%)
ASL 24.55 Increased By ▲ 0.65 (2.72%)
AVN 96.00 Increased By ▲ 2.31 (2.47%)
BOP 9.50 Decreased By ▼ -0.01 (-0.11%)
BYCO 9.79 Increased By ▲ 0.04 (0.41%)
DGKC 111.95 Increased By ▲ 1.70 (1.54%)
EPCL 48.65 Increased By ▲ 0.86 (1.8%)
FCCL 21.70 Increased By ▲ 0.43 (2.02%)
FFBL 27.40 Decreased By ▼ -0.01 (-0.04%)
FFL 19.12 Increased By ▲ 0.32 (1.7%)
HASCOL 14.52 Decreased By ▼ -0.04 (-0.27%)
HUBC 86.51 Decreased By ▼ -0.16 (-0.18%)
HUMNL 7.64 Increased By ▲ 0.31 (4.23%)
JSCL 32.28 Increased By ▲ 1.34 (4.33%)
KAPCO 41.65 Increased By ▲ 0.60 (1.46%)
KEL 4.36 Increased By ▲ 0.26 (6.34%)
LOTCHEM 16.45 Increased By ▲ 0.20 (1.23%)
MLCF 43.67 Increased By ▲ 0.65 (1.51%)
PAEL 39.85 Decreased By ▼ -0.05 (-0.13%)
PIBTL 13.05 Increased By ▲ 0.44 (3.49%)
POWER 11.68 Increased By ▲ 0.29 (2.55%)
PPL 94.50 Increased By ▲ 0.50 (0.53%)
PRL 24.25 Increased By ▲ 0.26 (1.08%)
PTC 9.40 Decreased By ▼ -0.10 (-1.05%)
SILK 1.27 Increased By ▲ 0.01 (0.79%)
SNGP 45.15 Increased By ▲ 0.15 (0.33%)
TRG 108.98 Increased By ▲ 2.53 (2.38%)
UNITY 34.11 Decreased By ▼ -0.08 (-0.23%)
WTL 1.14 Increased By ▲ 0.01 (0.88%)
BR100 4,866 Increased By ▲ 32.65 (0.68%)
BR30 24,821 Increased By ▲ 127.44 (0.52%)
KSE100 45,984 Increased By ▲ 307.52 (0.67%)
KSE30 19,148 Increased By ▲ 122.61 (0.64%)
Technology

Engineers harvest heart’s energy to power, recharge life-saving devices

In order to recharge life-saving devices such as pacemakers, researchers have figured out a new way of harvesting e
11 Feb 2019

In order to recharge life-saving devices such as pacemakers, researchers have figured out a new way of harvesting energy from the heart itself, more like a self-charging pacemaker.

Engineers from Dartmouth College have developed a dime-sized device through which kinetic energy of the heart can be converted into electricity for powering a wide-range of implantable devices.

Life-saving devices such as pacemakers, defibrillators and other implantable devices are usually powered by batteries that need to be replaced every five to 10 years. The replacements require surgery which can be expensive and can also possibly create complications and infections, as per Science Daily.

“We’re trying to solve the ultimate problem for any implantable biomedical device," said lead researcher John X.J. Zhang. “How do you create an effective energy source so the device will do its job during the entire life span of the patient, without the need for surgery to replace the battery?”

The team proposes modifying pacemakers to harness the kinetic energy of the lead wire that is attached to the heart, hence converting it into electricity to continually charge the batteries. The added material is a kind of thin polymer piezoelectric film called ‘PVDF’.

When designed with porous structures like an array of small buckle beams or a flexible cantilever, the device can convert even small mechanical motion to energy. Also, the same modules can potentially be used as sensors to allow data collection for real-time monitoring of patients.

“Of equal importance is that the device does not interfere with the body’s function,” said first author Lin Dong of the study published in Advanced Materials Technology. “We knew it had to be biocompatible, lightweight, flexible, and low profile, so it not only fits into the current pacemaker structure but is also scalable for future multi-functionality.”

Zhang and his team believes that the self-charging pacemaker is a long way to be available for consumer use and can be put to market in five years.

Copyright Business Recorder, 2019