AIRLINK 61.49 Increased By ▲ 2.99 (5.11%)
BOP 6.25 Decreased By ▼ -0.01 (-0.16%)
CNERGY 4.15 Increased By ▲ 0.19 (4.8%)
DFML 16.24 Increased By ▲ 0.23 (1.44%)
DGKC 67.47 Decreased By ▼ -1.08 (-1.58%)
FCCL 17.84 Decreased By ▼ -0.01 (-0.06%)
FFBL 25.62 Increased By ▲ 0.12 (0.47%)
FFL 9.24 Increased By ▲ 0.04 (0.43%)
GGL 10.02 Increased By ▲ 0.22 (2.24%)
HBL 114.75 Increased By ▲ 0.75 (0.66%)
HUBC 112.57 Increased By ▲ 0.72 (0.64%)
HUMNL 6.61 Increased By ▲ 0.08 (1.23%)
KEL 4.44 Increased By ▲ 0.07 (1.6%)
KOSM 4.57 Decreased By ▼ -0.02 (-0.44%)
MLCF 38.02 Increased By ▲ 0.22 (0.58%)
OGDC 125.01 Decreased By ▼ -0.43 (-0.34%)
PAEL 22.53 Decreased By ▼ -0.02 (-0.09%)
PIAA 11.13 No Change ▼ 0.00 (0%)
PIBTL 6.48 Increased By ▲ 0.30 (4.85%)
PPL 108.21 Decreased By ▼ -0.79 (-0.72%)
PRL 27.91 Increased By ▲ 1.10 (4.1%)
PTC 10.78 Increased By ▲ 0.23 (2.18%)
SEARL 52.86 Increased By ▲ 0.16 (0.3%)
SNGP 66.57 Increased By ▲ 0.22 (0.33%)
SSGC 11.39 Increased By ▲ 0.37 (3.36%)
TELE 7.22 Increased By ▲ 0.08 (1.12%)
TPLP 11.91 Decreased By ▼ -0.09 (-0.75%)
TRG 77.93 Increased By ▲ 1.48 (1.94%)
UNITY 21.91 Increased By ▲ 1.50 (7.35%)
WTL 1.31 No Change ▼ 0.00 (0%)
BR100 6,499 Increased By 58.4 (0.91%)
BR30 22,266 Increased By 167.8 (0.76%)
KSE100 63,306 Increased By 490.1 (0.78%)
KSE30 21,296 Increased By 162.7 (0.77%)
Technology

Google delays Chrome's blocking of tracking cookies to late 2023

  • After an investigation, Britain's Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) agreed this month with Google to oversee the Chrome changes. Google said its new timeline was in line with the agreement.
Published June 24, 2021

Google's Chrome web browser will not fully block tracking cookies until late 2023, the Alphabet Inc company said on Thursday, delaying by nearly two years a move that has drawn antitrust concerns from competitors and regulators.

Google had wanted to bar reams of ad-personalization companies from gathering users' browsing interests through cookies from January 2022. But rivals accused the world's biggest online ads seller by revenue of using improved privacy as a pretense to gain greater market share.

After an investigation, Britain's Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) agreed this month with Google to oversee the Chrome changes. Google said its new timeline was in line with the agreement.

"We need to move at a responsible pace, allowing sufficient time for public discussion on the right solutions and for publishers and the advertising industry to migrate their services," Vinay Goel, privacy engineering director for Chrome wrote in a blog post.

CMA could not immediately be reached for comment on Thursday.

The US Department of Justice has also investigated Chrome and cookies, Reuters has reported. The European Union's competition commission said Wednesday it too was investigating.

Google is working with the ad industry on technologies that could replace the tracking capabilities of cookies while better protecting online privacy.

It now aims to choose new techniques by late next year, do final testing and then gradually phase out tracking cookies starting mid-2023 if CMA signs off.

Critics question the effectiveness of alternatives. They add that Google can only benefit from the elimination of what are known as third-party cookies because it can continue collecting similar data through YouTube, search and its other popular systems. A data advantage could help Google attract more advertisers.

Apple Inc's Safari browser has pursued similar changes, but Chrome is used more widely in the United States and Europe.

Comments

Comments are closed.