AGL 5.50 Decreased By ▼ -0.10 (-1.79%)
ANL 8.69 Decreased By ▼ -0.21 (-2.36%)
AVN 75.84 Decreased By ▼ -1.14 (-1.48%)
BOP 5.18 Decreased By ▼ -0.07 (-1.33%)
CNERGY 4.51 Decreased By ▼ -0.14 (-3.01%)
EFERT 81.09 Decreased By ▼ -0.13 (-0.16%)
EPCL 50.00 Decreased By ▼ -0.03 (-0.06%)
FCCL 12.53 Decreased By ▼ -0.63 (-4.79%)
FFL 5.52 Decreased By ▼ -0.18 (-3.16%)
FLYNG 6.95 Decreased By ▼ -0.15 (-2.11%)
FNEL 4.65 Decreased By ▼ -0.11 (-2.31%)
GGGL 8.58 Decreased By ▼ -0.22 (-2.5%)
GGL 14.25 Decreased By ▼ -0.35 (-2.4%)
HUMNL 5.59 Decreased By ▼ -0.08 (-1.41%)
KEL 2.54 Decreased By ▼ -0.09 (-3.42%)
LOTCHEM 27.98 Decreased By ▼ -0.67 (-2.34%)
MLCF 23.70 Decreased By ▼ -0.99 (-4.01%)
OGDC 71.64 Decreased By ▼ -0.87 (-1.2%)
PAEL 15.09 Decreased By ▼ -0.28 (-1.82%)
PIBTL 4.89 Decreased By ▼ -0.09 (-1.81%)
PRL 15.81 Decreased By ▼ -0.39 (-2.41%)
SILK 1.07 No Change ▼ 0.00 (0%)
TELE 8.94 Decreased By ▼ -0.26 (-2.83%)
TPL 7.03 Decreased By ▼ -0.22 (-3.03%)
TPLP 18.31 Decreased By ▼ -0.39 (-2.09%)
TREET 21.03 Decreased By ▼ -0.67 (-3.09%)
TRG 134.55 Decreased By ▼ -2.00 (-1.46%)
UNITY 16.63 Decreased By ▼ -0.39 (-2.29%)
WAVES 9.32 Decreased By ▼ -0.57 (-5.76%)
WTL 1.36 Decreased By ▼ -0.05 (-3.55%)
BR100 4,154 Decreased By -71 (-1.68%)
BR30 15,289 Decreased By -229.2 (-1.48%)
KSE100 41,610 Decreased By -540.3 (-1.28%)
KSE30 15,371 Decreased By -216.8 (-1.39%)
Follow us

GENEVA: Fifty million people around the world are trapped in forced labour or forced marriage, the UN said Monday, warning that their ranks had swelled dramatically in recent years.

The United Nations had set a goal to eradicate all forms of modern slavery by 2030, but the number of people caught up in forced labour or forced marriage ballooned by 10 million between 2016 and 2021, according to a new report.

The study by the UN’s agencies for labour and migration along with the Walk Free Foundation found that at the end of last year, 28 million people were in forced labour and 22 million living in a marriage they had been forced into.

That means nearly one out of every 150 people in the world are caught up in modern forms of slavery, the report said.

The Covid-19 pandemic, which worsened conditions and swelled debt levels for many workers, has heightened the risk, the report found.

Coupled with the effects of climate change and armed conflicts, it has contributed to “unprecedented disruption to employment and education, increases in extreme poverty and forced and unsafe migration”, compounding the threat, it said.

“It is shocking that the situation of modern slavery is not improving,” Guy Ryder, head of the International Labour Organization (ILO), said in a statement.

“Nothing can justify the persistence of this fundamental abuse of human rights.”

It is a long-term problem, the report cautioned, with estimates indicating entrapment in forced labour can last years while forced marriage is often “a life sentence”.

Women and children are by far the most vulnerable.

Children account for one out of five people in forced labour, with more than half of them stuck in commercial sexual exploitation, the report said.

Migrant workers are more than three times likely to be in forced labour than non-migrant adult workers, it showed.

“This report underscores the urgency of ensuring that all migration is safe, orderly, and regular,” Antonio Vitorino, head of the International Organization for Migration (IOM), said in the statement.

Comments

Comments are closed.

50 million people stuck in ‘modern slavery’: UN

ECC approves wheat import of 450,000MT from Russia

Time to 'say no' to cartels, says PM, as energy bill touches $27bn

Intra-day update: rupee registers improvement against US dollar

UAE, Ukraine to start talks on bilateral trade deal

Oil prices rise after OPEC+ keeps output cut targets, China eases COVID curbs

Taliban acting defence minister holds talks with UAE president

Cotton arrival falls 40% year-on-year

Engro Corp to pursue potential investment opportunity in tower infrastructure sector

Big tax defaulters: FBR to auction off properties, trademarks

FBR set to fix minimum value for sugar supply