AGL 5.78 Increased By ▲ 0.03 (0.52%)
ANL 8.88 Increased By ▲ 0.03 (0.34%)
AVN 78.93 Decreased By ▼ -0.57 (-0.72%)
BOP 5.29 Increased By ▲ 0.12 (2.32%)
CNERGY 4.70 Increased By ▲ 0.01 (0.21%)
EFERT 81.57 Increased By ▲ 0.47 (0.58%)
EPCL 50.96 Decreased By ▼ -0.03 (-0.06%)
FCCL 13.35 Decreased By ▼ -0.14 (-1.04%)
FFL 5.74 Decreased By ▼ -0.07 (-1.2%)
FLYNG 7.15 Decreased By ▼ -0.06 (-0.83%)
FNEL 4.82 Increased By ▲ 0.02 (0.42%)
GGGL 8.87 Increased By ▲ 0.17 (1.95%)
GGL 15.90 Increased By ▲ 0.15 (0.95%)
HUMNL 5.79 Decreased By ▼ -0.06 (-1.03%)
KEL 2.68 Increased By ▲ 0.10 (3.88%)
LOTCHEM 29.06 Decreased By ▼ -0.44 (-1.49%)
MLCF 24.99 Decreased By ▼ -0.31 (-1.23%)
OGDC 72.46 Increased By ▲ 0.01 (0.01%)
PAEL 15.35 Decreased By ▼ -0.05 (-0.32%)
PIBTL 5.06 Decreased By ▼ -0.09 (-1.75%)
PRL 16.31 Increased By ▲ 0.06 (0.37%)
SILK 1.08 Increased By ▲ 0.01 (0.93%)
TELE 9.39 Increased By ▲ 0.09 (0.97%)
TPL 7.34 Decreased By ▼ -0.01 (-0.14%)
TPLP 18.90 Decreased By ▼ -0.26 (-1.36%)
TREET 21.95 Increased By ▲ 0.10 (0.46%)
TRG 140.87 Decreased By ▼ -1.93 (-1.35%)
UNITY 17.01 Decreased By ▼ -0.19 (-1.1%)
WAVES 9.90 Decreased By ▼ -0.13 (-1.3%)
WTL 1.41 Increased By ▲ 0.03 (2.17%)
BR100 4,255 Increased By 7.1 (0.17%)
BR30 15,733 Decreased By -28.8 (-0.18%)
KSE100 42,394 Increased By 44.9 (0.11%)
KSE30 15,664 Increased By 31.9 (0.2%)
Follow us

Research teams at Intel Corp on Saturday unveiled work that the company believes will help it keep speeding up and shrinking computing chips over the next ten years, with several technologies aimed at stacking parts of chips on top of each other.

Intel's Research Components Group introduced the work in papers at an international conference being held in San Francisco.

The Silicon Valley company is working to regain a lead in making the smallest, fastest chips that it has lost in recent years to rivals like Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co and Samsung Electronics Co Ltd.

While Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger has laid out commercial plans aimed at regaining that lead by 2025, the research work unveiled Saturday gives a look into how Intel plans to compete beyond 2025.

One of the ways Intel is packing more computing power into chips by stacking up "tiles" or "chiplets" in three dimensions rather than making chips all as one two-dimension piece. Intel showed work Saturday that could allow for 10 times as many connections between stacked tiles, meaning that more complex tiles can be stacked on top of one another.

But perhaps the biggest advance showed Saturday was a research paper demonstrating a way to stack transistors - tiny switches that form the most basic building bocks of chips by representing the 1s and 0s of digital logic - on top of one another.

Intel believes the technology will yield a 30% to 50% increase in the number of transistors it can pack into a given area on a chip. Raising the number of transistors is the main reason chips have consistently gotten faster over the past 50 years.

"By stacking the devices directly on top of each other, we're clearly saving area," Paul Fischer, director and senior principal engineer of Intel's Components Research Group told Reuters in an interview. "We're reducing interconnect lengths and really saving energy, making this not only more cost efficient, but also better performing."

Comments

Comments are closed.

Intel shows research for packing more computing power into chips beyond 2025

Pakistan's CPI-based inflation in November clocks in at 23.8%

Rupee registers gains, settles at 223.69 against US dollar

Rise in TTP attacks in Pakistan should be concern for Afghan Taliban as well: Rana Sanaullah

SBP-held foreign exchange reserves fall $327mn, stand at $7.5bn

Fawad says PTI to dissolve Punjab, KP assemblies next week

EU tentatively agrees $60 a barrel price cap on Russian seaborne oil

No restrictions placed on LCs for import of oil, other petroleum products: SBP

Record-breaking England put Pakistan to the sword in first Test

Google app payments: IT ministry says issue resolved

Oil buoyed by OPEC+ output speculation and easing China COVID curbs