12082016Thu
Last update: Thu, 08 Dec 2016 05am

South America

World - South America

Brazil's Temer confident of spending cap but has no plan B BRASILIA: Brazilian President Michel Temer said on Monday he was confident his proposal to cap public spending would be approved in Congress, but had no alternative plan to avert a fiscal crisis that threatened to further sink Latin America's biggest economy. Temer was scrambling to get the three-fifths of votes needed in the lower house of Congress to approve the constitutional amendment. He met with dozens of lawmakers late on Sunday and gave leaves of absence to two of his ministers to cast votes on Monday. "This amendment is crucial for the country," Temer said in a radio interview. "We believe it is perfectly possible to approve it.We are not even going to think of a plan B." Temer said the cap was needed to avoid tax increases that many analysts see as inevitable for closing a budget deficit that is on track to exceed 10 percent of gross domestic ...

World - South America

Santos: Colombia rebels' archfoe turned peacemaker BOGOTA: Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, who won the Nobel Peace Prize Friday, is a son of a powerful family who staked his legacy on troubled efforts to make peace with the communist FARC rebels.The Nobel Committee hailed the two-term president's "resolute" bid to end Latin America's longest conflict -- despite a shock referendum defeat last weekend for the peace accord he has championed."I prefer an imperfect accord that saves lives to a perfect war ...

World - South America

Chile Bachelet's approval rating picks up in Sept after historical low SANTIAGO: Chilean President Michelle Bachelet's approval rating ticked higher in September, breaking a recent downward trend that had pushed her ratings to an historical low a month earlier, pollster Gfk Adimark said on Thursday. Center-left Bachelet, who ruled in 2006-2010 and then returned for another four years in 2014, had enjoyed sky-high ratings after her first term. But those numbers plummeted as her ambitious second-term reform agenda to tackle inequality and education of the poor ...

World - South America

Colombian president to meet rival over failed peace deal BOGOTA: Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos will meet his predecessor and top rival Alvaro Uribe on Wednesday to discuss salvaging the peace process with the FARC rebels, officials said.The high-stakes meeting comes after voters rejected a peace deal Uribe had condemned as too lenient on the leftist guerrillas -- throwing the peace process into disarray and giving the former president a major victory.The political enemies will meet at 11:30 am (1630 GMT) at the presidential ...

World - South America

Elections over, Brazil tackles unpopular spending reforms BRASILIA: Brazilian President Michel Temer's government introduced to Congress on Tuesday a landmark constitutional amendment to cap public spending, seeking to press ahead with unpopular reforms in the wake of last weekend's municipal elections. Temer's new center-right government hopes the proposal, which would limit growth in spending to the rate of inflation for up to 20 years, will clear a Congressional committee this week and be put to a vote in the lower house by ...

World - South America

Little improvement in Temer government's popularity BRASILIA: President Michel Temer has not managed to convince Brazilians his government is better than that of his ousted predecessor Dilma Rousseff, and his popularity remains low, according to a poll on Tuesday. Pollster Ibope said the number of people who consider Temer's government "great" or "good" edged up to 14 percent from 13 percent in the previous survey in late June, which was conducted six weeks after he replaced Rousseff when her impeachment trial ...

World - South America

Colombian rebels confirm they will pay reparations to victims BOGOTA: Colombia's FARC rebels said Saturday they would pay reparations to victims of the country's long war under a recent peace accord.Until now, the guerrillas had said they did not have money to pay damages because everything went to their war effort.And critics of the peace accord, signed Monday by the leftist rebels and the government after nearly four years of negotiations, have argued that the guerrillas would not pay damages even if they had ...